BEGIN:VCALENDAR VERSION:2.0 PRODID:-//Department of History - ECPv4.8.2//NONSGML v1.0//EN CALSCALE:GREGORIAN METHOD:PUBLISH X-WR-CALNAME:Department of History X-ORIGINAL-URL:https://history.wisc.edu X-WR-CALDESC:Events for Department of History BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/Chicago:20191002T190000 DTEND;TZID=America/Chicago:20191002T210000 DTSTAMP:20191021T232345 CREATED:20190924T160037Z LAST-MODIFIED:20190924T163455Z UID:21834-1570042800-1570050000@history.wisc.edu SUMMARY:Kutler Lectures: James Loeffler DESCRIPTION:“Blind Justice: Jews and Hate Speech in the American 1950s”\nJames Loeffler\nProfessor of Jewish History\nUniversity of Virginia \nWednesday\, October 2nd\, 2019\n7:00-9:00 PM\nPyle Center (702 Langdon St) \nInitiated by the late UW historian Stanley Kutler and his wife Sandra more than twenty years ago\, the Kutler series brings to Madison esteemed scholars of American Jews. \nBiography \nJames Loeffler is Jay Berkowitz Professor of Jewish History at the University of Virginia. Between 2013 and 2015 he was a Mellon Foundation New Directions Fellow in International Law and Dean’s Visiting Scholar at the Georgetown University Law Center. At UVa he teaches courses in Jewish and European history\, Russian and East European history\, international legal history\, and the history of human rights. He is a co-covenor of the UVa Human Rights Research Network\, a faculty partner in the UVa Religion\, Race & Democracy Lab\, and co-chair of the Page-Barbour & James W. Richard Lectures Committee. \nHis publications include The Law of Strangers: Jewish Lawyers and International Law in the Twentieth Century (Cambridge University Press\, 2019)\, Rooted Cosmopolitans: Jews and Human Rights in the Twentieth Century (Yale University Press\, 2018) and The Most Musical Nation: Jews and Culture in the Late Russian Empire (Yale University Press\, 2010). \nHis current research interests include the history of human rights\, the history of nationalism\, internationalism\, and transnationalism\, and the legal history of American and international anti-racism and counter-antisemitism. \nSponsored by: Mosse/Weinstein Center for Jewish Studies \n\n  \n URL:https://history.wisc.edu/event/kutler-lectures-james-loeffler/ LOCATION:Pyle Center\, 702 Langdon St\, \, Madison\, WI\, 53706 GEO:43.0763052;-89.3977239 X-APPLE-STRUCTURED-LOCATION;VALUE=URI;X-ADDRESS=Pyle Center 702 Langdon St Madison WI 53706;X-APPLE-RADIUS=500;X-TITLE=702 Langdon St\,:geo:-89.3977239,43.0763052 CATEGORIES:2019,All Events,George Mosse Program,History Events,Jewish History,Lectures and Talks,U.S./North American History END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/Chicago:20191004T120000 DTEND;TZID=America/Chicago:20191004T130000 DTSTAMP:20191021T232345 CREATED:20190924T201409Z LAST-MODIFIED:20190924T201409Z UID:21878-1570190400-1570194000@history.wisc.edu SUMMARY:History of Science Brown Bag DESCRIPTION:“Radical Psychiatry: 50 Years Later”\nLucas Richert \nFriday\, October 4\, 2019\n12:00-1:00pm\n1116 Rennebohm Hall (School of Pharmacy) \n  \n\nAll Brown Bags are held in the Curti Lounge (unless otherwise noted) from 12:00-1:00 PM on Fridays.\nFuture Brown HSMT Bags \n\nFriday\, October 11 – “Digital Humanities and the History of Slavery” by Pablo Gomez\nFriday\, October 18 – “In Sickness and in Health? Wisconsin’s Eugenic Marriage Law\, 1913–1981” by Emma Wathen\nFriday\, October 25 – “Staggering Losses: WW1 & the 1918 Influenza Pandemic: Exhibition Installation and the Research Enterprise” by Michaela Sullivan-Fowler\nFriday\, November 1 – “Cementing Gender: The Puccafication of Social Categories in Urbanizing India” by Siddarth Menon\nFriday\, November 8 – “Turning your Dissertation into a Book” by Karen Darling\nFriday\, November 15 – Topic: TBA by Katharina Steiner\nFriday\, November 22 – “Experiences of irreproducibility: Students’ stories” by Nicole Nelson\nFriday\, December 6 – TBA\n\nCurti Lounge\nRm. 5233 Humanities Bldg. \n URL:https://history.wisc.edu/event/history-of-science-brown-bag-oct4/ LOCATION:Rennebohm Hall\, 777 Highland Ave\, Madison\, WI\, 53705\, United States CATEGORIES:2019,All Events,History Events,History of Science, Medicine, and Technology,Lectures and Talks END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/Chicago:20191004T180000 DTEND;TZID=America/Chicago:20191004T200000 DTSTAMP:20191021T232345 CREATED:20190918T181151Z LAST-MODIFIED:20190918T181618Z UID:21806-1570212000-1570219200@history.wisc.edu SUMMARY:6th Annual Feminist Faculty Book Party DESCRIPTION:The 6th Annual Feminist Faculty Book Party\nFriday\, October 4th\, 2019\n6:00-8:00\nA Room of One’s Own Bookstore(315 W Gorham St) \nThis event brings together faculty authors from UW-Madison and other local colleges who have published books in the current academic year. \nThis year\, we convene to celebrate the recently released work of: Elizabeth Bearden\, Nan Enstad\, Keisha Lindsay\, Jenna M. Loyd\, Aili Tripp\, and Mark Vareschi! \nStarted in 2014 by GWS professor Ellen Samuels\, this annual tradition is an occasion to celebrate the intellectual\, creative\, and political labor of local feminist faculty and to share the love with the Madison feminist community. We define feminist broadly and intersectionally to include work in gender\, queer\, trans\, ethnic\, critical race\, and disability studies. \nThere will be libations\, admiration\, and most exciting of all\, BOOK CAKE! \n\n  \n URL:https://history.wisc.edu/event/6th-annual-feminist-faculty-book-party/ LOCATION:WI CATEGORIES:2019,All Events,Gender and Women’s History,History Events END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/Chicago:20191007T112000 DTEND;TZID=America/Chicago:20191007T132000 DTSTAMP:20191021T232345 CREATED:20190506T151825Z LAST-MODIFIED:20190506T151825Z UID:19905-1570447200-1570454400@history.wisc.edu SUMMARY:Department Council Meetings DESCRIPTION:Department Council Meetings\n11:50-1:20 PM\n\nFall 2019 Dates \n\nTuesday\, September 3rd\nMonday\, October 7th\nMonday\, November 4th\nMonday\, December 2nd\n\nLocations: \nFaculty Council – 3rd Floor Conference Room\nGraduate Council Meeting – Room 5257 Mosse Humanities\nUndergraduate Council Meeting – Room 5245 Mosse Humanities \n URL:https://history.wisc.edu/event/department-council-meetings-fall2019/2019-10-07/ LOCATION:WI CATEGORIES:2019,All Events,History Events,Meetings END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/Chicago:20191011T120000 DTEND;TZID=America/Chicago:20191011T130000 DTSTAMP:20191021T232345 CREATED:20190924T201733Z LAST-MODIFIED:20190924T201937Z UID:21881-1570795200-1570798800@history.wisc.edu SUMMARY:History of Science Brown Bag DESCRIPTION:“Digital Humanities and the History of Slavery”\nPablo Gomez\nUW-Madison\n \nFriday\, October 11\, 2019\n12:00-1:00pm\nCurti Lounge (Rm. 5233 Humanities Bldg.) \n  \n\nAll Brown Bags are held in the Curti Lounge (unless otherwise noted) from 12:00-1:00 PM on Fridays.\nFuture Brown HSMT Bags \n\nFriday\, October 18 – “In Sickness and in Health? Wisconsin’s Eugenic Marriage Law\, 1913–1981” by Emma Wathen\nFriday\, October 25 – “Staggering Losses: WW1 & the 1918 Influenza Pandemic: Exhibition Installation and the Research Enterprise” by Michaela Sullivan-Fowler\nFriday\, November 1 – “Cementing Gender: The Puccafication of Social Categories in Urbanizing India” by Siddarth Menon\nFriday\, November 8 – “Turning your Dissertation into a Book” by Karen Darling\nFriday\, November 15 – Topic: TBA by Katharina Steiner\nFriday\, November 22 – “Experiences of irreproducibility: Students’ stories” by Nicole Nelson\nFriday\, December 6 – TBA\n\nCurti Lounge\nRm. 5233 Humanities Bldg. \n URL:https://history.wisc.edu/event/history-of-science-brown-bag-oct11/ LOCATION:Curti Lounge (Rm 5243 Mosse Humanities Bldg)\, 455 N. Park St.\, Madison\, WI\, 53706\, United States GEO:43.0738097;-89.4000006 X-APPLE-STRUCTURED-LOCATION;VALUE=URI;X-ADDRESS=Curti Lounge (Rm 5243 Mosse Humanities Bldg) 455 N. Park St. Madison WI 53706 United States;X-APPLE-RADIUS=500;X-TITLE=455 N. Park St.:geo:-89.4000006,43.0738097 CATEGORIES:2019,All Events,History Events,History of Science, Medicine, and Technology,Latin American and Caribbean History END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/Chicago:20191011T163000 DTEND;TZID=America/Chicago:20191011T180000 DTSTAMP:20191021T232345 CREATED:20190108T205622Z LAST-MODIFIED:20190926T152850Z UID:18393-1570811400-1570816800@history.wisc.edu SUMMARY:2019 James Madison Lecture DESCRIPTION:Click to enlarge (pdf)\n“Masters of Empire: Great Lakes Indians and the Making of America”\nMichael A. McDonnell\nProfessor of History\nUniversity of Sydney – Faculty Profile \nWednesday\, October 11\, 2019\n4:30 PM\nWisconsin Historical Society \nAuthor and Historian\, Michael A. McDonnell\, will reveal the pivotal role played by the native peoples of the Great Lakes in the history of North America.  Masters of Empire: Great Lakes Indians and the Making of America (2016\, Macmillan). \nHighlighting the long-standing rivalries and relationships among the great Indian nations of North America\, McDonnell shows how Europeans often played only a minor role in this history\, and reminds us that it was native peoples who possessed intricate and far-reaching networks of commerce and kinship. By calling attention to the Great Lakes as a crucible of culture and conflict\, McDonnell reimagines the landscape of American history. \nMcDonnell is Associate Professor of History at the University of Sydney. He is the author of several prize-winning books and articles and has served as a distinguished lecturer for the Organization of American Historians. \nThis program is co-sponsored by the UW-Madison Center for the Study of the American Constitution and the Brown County Library. \n\n  \n URL:https://history.wisc.edu/event/2019-james-madison-lecture/ LOCATION:Wisconsin Historical Society Auditorium\, 816 State St\, Madison\, WI GEO:43.0754017;-89.4000542 X-APPLE-STRUCTURED-LOCATION;VALUE=URI;X-ADDRESS=Wisconsin Historical Society Auditorium 816 State St Madison WI;X-APPLE-RADIUS=500;X-TITLE=816 State St:geo:-89.4000542,43.0754017 CATEGORIES:2019,All Events,History Events,Lectures and Talks,U.S./North American History END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/Chicago:20191014T120000 DTEND;TZID=America/Chicago:20191014T133000 DTSTAMP:20191021T232345 CREATED:20190906T163606Z LAST-MODIFIED:20190906T163606Z UID:21716-1571054400-1571059800@history.wisc.edu SUMMARY:Lecture: Adam Laats DESCRIPTION:Click to view pdf\n“How Conservatives Won Their Fight With the Public Schools”\nLecture and Discussion by\nAdam Laats\nBinghamton University \nMonday\, October 14\, 2019\n12:00 to 1:30 pm\,\nEducation 245 \nAdam Laats is a Professor of Teaching\, Learning and Educational Leadership at Binghamton University (SUNY). He holds a Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin–Madison and writes about the history of cultural battles over schooling and school reform. \n\n  \n URL:https://history.wisc.edu/event/lecture-adam-laats/ LOCATION:Education Building\, 1000 Bascom Mall\, Madison\, 53706\, United States GEO:43.0757439;-89.4022539 X-APPLE-STRUCTURED-LOCATION;VALUE=URI;X-ADDRESS=Education Building 1000 Bascom Mall Madison 53706 United States;X-APPLE-RADIUS=500;X-TITLE=1000 Bascom Mall:geo:-89.4022539,43.0757439 CATEGORIES:2019,All Events,Alumni,History Events,Lectures and Talks,U.S./North American History END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/Chicago:20191014T153000 DTEND;TZID=America/Chicago:20191014T170000 DTSTAMP:20191021T232345 CREATED:20190924T163355Z LAST-MODIFIED:20190924T163548Z UID:21838-1571067000-1571072400@history.wisc.edu SUMMARY:Seminar: Gloria Whiting DESCRIPTION:“The Troubled History of Family and Slavery in New England”\nGloria Whiting\nE. Gordon Fox Assistant Professor of History\nHistory\, UW-Madison \nMonday\, October 14\, 2019\n3:30-5:00 PM\nUniversity Club\, Room 212 \nNew England has long been seen as a cradle of liberty in American history\, yet it was also a cradle of slavery. From the earliest years of colonization\, New Englanders bought\, traded\, and sold people—most of whom were African. My project tells New England’s early history from the perspective of these people: the people who belonged to others. It pays particular attention to the contours of their intimate lives\, asking how belonging to owners prevented the enslaved from belonging to one another. But the project does more than lay bare the obstacles to family stability for bound New Englanders; it also explores how people of color responded to these limitations. Ultimately\, I argue that the actions taken by the enslaved to fortify their families played an important role in bringing about the sudden and poorly understood collapse of slavery in Massachusetts. \nSponsored by: Institute for Research in the Humanities \n\n  \n URL:https://history.wisc.edu/event/seminar-gloria-whiting/ LOCATION:University Club\, 803 State St\, Madiison\, WI\, 53703\, United States GEO:43.074558;-89.3992969 X-APPLE-STRUCTURED-LOCATION;VALUE=URI;X-ADDRESS=University Club 803 State St Madiison WI 53703 United States;X-APPLE-RADIUS=500;X-TITLE=803 State St:geo:-89.3992969,43.074558 CATEGORIES:2019,All Events,Faculty,Gender and Women’s History,History Events,U.S./North American History END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/Chicago:20191016T180000 DTEND;TZID=America/Chicago:20191016T193000 DTSTAMP:20191021T232345 CREATED:20191014T170007Z LAST-MODIFIED:20191014T170007Z UID:21974-1571248800-1571254200@history.wisc.edu SUMMARY:Lecture: David Zersen DESCRIPTION:Click to enlarge (pdf)\n“The Wends of Texas: a Case Study of German Minority Immigration to the U.S.”\nDavid Zersen\nPresident Emeritus\nConcordia University Texas \nWednesday\, October 16\, 2019\n6:00 PM\nMemorial Library\, Room 126 \nSorbs or Wends are a Slavic minority living in a region of eastern Germany that borders Poland and the Czech Republic. In the mid-19th century\, many Sorbs/Wends immigrated to Australia\, South Africa\, South America\, and Canada\, with the largest group settling in Lee County\, Texas. This presentation will address the history of the Sorbs/Wends as they lived among German-speakers in Europe and in the U.S.\, including their contributions to literature\, theology\, and music. \nDavid Zersen is President Emeritus of Concordia University Texas. He holds D.Min and Ed.D. (Teacher’s College\, Columbia University) degrees\, having done graduate work at Georg August University in Goettingen\, Germany. He is a Lutheran clergyman and a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society. Dr. Zersen has published extensively on Sorbian/Wendish topics. \nSponsored by: Max Kade Institute for German-American Studies and Center for German and European Studies at UW-Madison \n\n  \n URL:https://history.wisc.edu/event/lecture-david-zersen/ LOCATION:Memorial Library\, 728 State Street\, Madison\, WI\, United States GEO:43.0745924;-89.3993421 X-APPLE-STRUCTURED-LOCATION;VALUE=URI;X-ADDRESS=Memorial Library 728 State Street Madison WI United States;X-APPLE-RADIUS=500;X-TITLE=728 State Street:geo:-89.3993421,43.0745924 CATEGORIES:2019,All Events,European History,History Events,U.S./North American History END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/Chicago:20191018T120000 DTEND;TZID=America/Chicago:20191018T130000 DTSTAMP:20191021T232345 CREATED:20190924T202512Z LAST-MODIFIED:20190924T202512Z UID:21885-1571400000-1571403600@history.wisc.edu SUMMARY:History of Science Brown Bag DESCRIPTION:“In Sickness and in Health? Wisconsin’s Eugenic Marriage Law\, 1913–1981”\nEmma Wathen\nHSMT Graduate Student\, UW-Madison\n \nFriday\, October 18\, 2019\n12:00-1:00pm\nCurti Lounge (Rm. 5233 Humanities Bldg.) \n  \n\nAll Brown Bags are held in the Curti Lounge (unless otherwise noted) from 12:00-1:00 PM on Fridays.\nFuture Brown HSMT Bags \n\nFriday\, October 25 – “Staggering Losses: WW1 & the 1918 Influenza Pandemic: Exhibition Installation and the Research Enterprise” by Michaela Sullivan-Fowler\nFriday\, November 1 – “Cementing Gender: The Puccafication of Social Categories in Urbanizing India” by Siddarth Menon\nFriday\, November 8 – “Turning your Dissertation into a Book” by Karen Darling\nFriday\, November 15 – Topic: TBA by Katharina Steiner\nFriday\, November 22 – “Experiences of irreproducibility: Students’ stories” by Nicole Nelson\nFriday\, December 6 – TBA\n\nCurti Lounge\nRm. 5233 Humanities Bldg. \n URL:https://history.wisc.edu/event/history-of-science-brown-bag-oct18/ LOCATION:Curti Lounge (Rm 5243 Mosse Humanities Bldg)\, 455 N. Park St.\, Madison\, WI\, 53706\, United States GEO:43.0738097;-89.4000006 X-APPLE-STRUCTURED-LOCATION;VALUE=URI;X-ADDRESS=Curti Lounge (Rm 5243 Mosse Humanities Bldg) 455 N. Park St. Madison WI 53706 United States;X-APPLE-RADIUS=500;X-TITLE=455 N. Park St.:geo:-89.4000006,43.0738097 CATEGORIES:2019,All Events,Graduate Program,History Events,History of Science, Medicine, and Technology,Lectures and Talks END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/Chicago:20191021T115000 DTEND;TZID=America/Chicago:20191021T132000 DTSTAMP:20191021T232345 CREATED:20190506T163536Z LAST-MODIFIED:20190506T163536Z UID:19916-1571658600-1571664000@history.wisc.edu SUMMARY:Department Meeting DESCRIPTION:\nHistory Department Meetings\nFall 2019 Dates \n\nMonday\, September 16th\nMonday\, October 21st\nMonday\, November 18th\nMonday\, December 9th\n\n11:50 – 1:20 PM\nCurti Lounge (5233 Mosse Humanities Bldg.) \n\n URL:https://history.wisc.edu/event/department-meeting-fall2019/2019-10-21/ LOCATION:Curti Lounge (Rm 5243 Mosse Humanities Bldg)\, 455 N. Park St.\, Madison\, WI\, 53706\, United States GEO:43.0738097;-89.4000006 X-APPLE-STRUCTURED-LOCATION;VALUE=URI;X-ADDRESS=Curti Lounge (Rm 5243 Mosse Humanities Bldg) 455 N. Park St. Madison WI 53706 United States;X-APPLE-RADIUS=500;X-TITLE=455 N. Park St.:geo:-89.4000006,43.0738097 CATEGORIES:2019,All Events,History Events,Meetings,Shared Events END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/Chicago:20191022T123000 DTEND;TZID=America/Chicago:20191022T133000 DTSTAMP:20191021T232345 CREATED:20191014T170943Z LAST-MODIFIED:20191014T171032Z UID:21978-1571747400-1571751000@history.wisc.edu SUMMARY:Lecture: Casey Marina Lurtz DESCRIPTION:“From the Grounds Up: Building the Economy and the State in 19th Century Mexico”\nCasey Marina Lurtz\nAssistant Professor of Modern Latin America History\nJohns Hopkins University \nTuesday\, Oxtober 22\, 2019\n12:30-1:30 PM\n206 Ingraham Hall \nIn the late nineteenth century\, Latin American exports boomed. From Chihuahua to Patagonia\, producers sent industrial fibers\, tropical fruits\, and staple goods across oceans to satisfy the ever-increasing demand from foreign markets. In this talk\, Casey Lurtz uses the growing coffee economy of southernmost Mexico to examine who built these export economies and how they transformed rural societies. Placing indigenous and mestizo villagers\, migrant workers\, and local politicians at the center of our understanding of the export boom\, she argues for a diversified embrace of the institutions and activities of global market production. An isolated\, impoverished backwater for most of the nineteenth century\, by 1920\, the Soconusco region of Chiapas\, Mexico had transformed into a small but vibrant node in the web of global commerce. Alongside plantation owners and foreign investors\, a dense but little-explored web of small-time producers\, shopowners\, and laborers played key roles in the rapid expansion of export production and the liberal state that undergirded it. Mayan plantation workers helped decide where the Guatemala-Mexico border would be drawn. Mestizo villagers used liberal land law to keep and grow coffee on their smallholdings. Widows drew on contract law to protect their businesses. These actors’ deep engagement with rural development challenges the standard top-down narrative of market integration led by economic elites allied with a strong state. Their choices had profound impacts on the shape of Latin America’s export economies and the states they undergirded during the first era of globalization. \nAbout the speaker: Casey Marina Lurtz is a historian of modern Latin America and an assistant professor at the Johns Hopkins University. She received her PhD from the University of Chicago and her research has been supported by a Fulbright Hays fellowship\, the UC San Diego Center for US-Mexican Studies\, the Harvard-Newcomen Postdoctoral fellowship\, and the Harvard Academy for International & Area Studies. She is currently a distinguished fellow at the Notre Dame Institute for Advanced Studies\, where she is researching a new project on ideas of development and the environment in nineteenth century Latin America. Her book\, From the Grounds Up: Building an Export Economy in Southern Mexico was published by Stanford University Press earlier this year. \n\n  \n URL:https://history.wisc.edu/event/lecture-casey-marina-lurtz/ LOCATION:Ingraham Hall\, 1155 Observatory Dr\, Madison\, WI\, 53706\, United States CATEGORIES:2019,All Events,History Events,Latin American and Caribbean History END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/Chicago:20191023T155000 DTEND;TZID=America/Chicago:20191023T165000 DTSTAMP:20191021T232345 CREATED:20191016T183007Z LAST-MODIFIED:20191016T183007Z UID:22018-1571845800-1571849400@history.wisc.edu SUMMARY:Critical Political Economy Seminar Meeting DESCRIPTION:Critical Political Economy Seminar\nWednesday\, October 23\, 2019\n3:50-4:50 PM\nCurti Lounge \n URL:https://history.wisc.edu/event/critical-political-economy-seminar-meeting/ LOCATION:Curti Lounge (Rm 5243 Mosse Humanities Bldg)\, 455 N. Park St.\, Madison\, WI\, 53706\, United States GEO:43.0738097;-89.4000006 X-APPLE-STRUCTURED-LOCATION;VALUE=URI;X-ADDRESS=Curti Lounge (Rm 5243 Mosse Humanities Bldg) 455 N. Park St. Madison WI 53706 United States;X-APPLE-RADIUS=500;X-TITLE=455 N. Park St.:geo:-89.4000006,43.0738097 CATEGORIES:2019,All Events,History Events,Meetings END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/Chicago:20191024T120000 DTEND;TZID=America/Chicago:20191024T130000 DTSTAMP:20191021T232345 CREATED:20191016T205415Z LAST-MODIFIED:20191016T205415Z UID:22022-1571918400-1571922000@history.wisc.edu SUMMARY:Lecture: Dr. Meenakshi (Sumathi) Krishnan DESCRIPTION:“The Making of Carnatic Music (CE 1800-2000) & The Forces of Change”\nDr. Meenakshi (Sumathi) Krishnan\nDirector\, Research Centre\,\nMusic Academy\, Madras \nThursday\, October 24\, 2019\n12:00-1:00 PM\n206 Ingraham Hall \nIn the 200-year period of the 19th and 20th centuries\, there have been unprecedented changes in music theory and practice.  These have given rise to upheavals\, revolts against traditional practices\, and a breaking from accepted and existing formats of performance in what has come to known as Carnatic Music\, the classical music of South India. \nIn this presentation\, the key things I will focus on are significant milestones in musical history along with the resultant changes to music theory and practice. Luminaries who have charted a new path and become exemplars for subsequent generations of musicians are key to this study. Royal patronage of the 19th century supported musicians\, but also placed constraints. There were significant changes to music theory in this period\, that affected practices. A key influence was the colonial influence and its impact on notation and music education. Carnatic music played a role in nation building\, and forged a path for itself into contemporary India\, through institutionalizing cultural knowledge. As musicians from smaller towns converged to erstwhile Madras\, now Chennai\, they had to perform to new contexts and audiences\, themselves becoming harbingers of change. \nSome of the questions I will address are\, what was the role of systematizing practices of the raga system or stated simply\, the melodic scale\, in the making of Carnatic music? What role did texts play\, in mediating between theory and practice in what is predominantly ‘manodharma’ or creative improvisational musical practice? What were the forces that led to creation of exclusive musical institutions? Finally I focus on the making of the Carnatic musician\, through the study of historic exemplars who made a mark in different areas of Carnatic music. \nSponsored by: Center for South Asia \n\n  \n URL:https://history.wisc.edu/event/lecture-dr-meenakshi-sumathi-krishnan/ LOCATION:Ingraham Hall\, 1155 Observatory Dr\, Madison\, WI\, 53706\, United States CATEGORIES:2019,All Events,History Events,Lectures and Talks,South Asian History END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/Chicago:20191024T160000 DTEND;TZID=America/Chicago:20191024T173000 DTSTAMP:20191021T232345 CREATED:20190905T193252Z LAST-MODIFIED:20190905T193252Z UID:21711-1571932800-1571938200@history.wisc.edu SUMMARY:History of Science Colloquium DESCRIPTION:“Documenting Difference: Creating Foreign Medical Graduates”\nEram Alam\nHarvard University \nRefreshments start at 3:45\nColloquium begins at 4:00 PM \n984 Memorial Library (Special Collections)\n728 State St\, Madison\, WI \n\n URL:https://history.wisc.edu/event/history-of-science-colloquium-oct19/ LOCATION:Memorial Library\, 728 State Street\, Madison\, WI\, United States GEO:43.0745924;-89.3993421 X-APPLE-STRUCTURED-LOCATION;VALUE=URI;X-ADDRESS=Memorial Library 728 State Street Madison WI United States;X-APPLE-RADIUS=500;X-TITLE=728 State Street:geo:-89.3993421,43.0745924 CATEGORIES:2019,All Events,History Events,History of Science, Medicine, and Technology END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/Chicago:20191025T120000 DTEND;TZID=America/Chicago:20191025T130000 DTSTAMP:20191021T232345 CREATED:20190924T203006Z LAST-MODIFIED:20190927T213501Z UID:21887-1572004800-1572008400@history.wisc.edu SUMMARY:History of Science Brown Bag DESCRIPTION:“Staggering Losses: WW1 & the 1918 Influenza Pandemic: Exhibition Installation and the Research Enterprise”\nMicaela Sullivan-Fowler\nCurator/History of Health Sciences Librarian\, UW-Madison\n \nFriday\, October 25\, 2019\n12:00-1:00pm\n3rd floor of Ebling Library\nHealth Sciences Center (750 Highland Ave). \n  \n\nAll Brown Bags are held in the Curti Lounge (unless otherwise noted) from 12:00-1:00 PM on Fridays.\nFuture Brown HSMT Bags \n\nFriday\, November 1 – “Cementing Gender: The Puccafication of Social Categories in Urbanizing India” by Siddarth Menon\nFriday\, November 8 – “Turning your Dissertation into a Book” by Karen Darling\nFriday\, November 15 – Topic: TBA by Katharina Steiner\nFriday\, November 22 – “Experiences of irreproducibility: Students’ stories” by Nicole Nelson\nFriday\, December 6 – TBA\n\nCurti Lounge\nRm. 5233 Humanities Bldg. \n URL:https://history.wisc.edu/event/history-of-science-brown-bag-oct25/ LOCATION:Health Sciences Center\, 750 Highland Ave\, Madison\, WI\, 53705\, United States CATEGORIES:2019,All Events,History Events,History of Science, Medicine, and Technology,Lectures and Talks,Meetings END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/Chicago:20191028T115000 DTEND;TZID=America/Chicago:20191028T132000 DTSTAMP:20191021T232345 CREATED:20190506T170019Z LAST-MODIFIED:20191015T183605Z UID:19925-1572263400-1572268800@history.wisc.edu SUMMARY:History Dept Colloquium DESCRIPTION:Click to enlarge (pdf)\n“Law and the State”\nMonday\, October 28\, 2019\n11:50-1:20 PM\nCurti Lounge (Rm. 5233 Mosse Humanities Bldg) \n“The Bard of Buru and the Guerrilla Goddess of Con Dao: Counter-narratives of Resistance on two Prison Islands in Indonesia and Vietnam”\nRoyce Novak: \n“Poison and Falsity in South Asian Forensics”\nMitra Sharafi \nCharlotte Whatley will moderate. \nSnacks and drinks will be served.\n \n\n  \n URL:https://history.wisc.edu/event/history-dept-colloquium-oct2019/ LOCATION:Madison\, WI\, United States CATEGORIES:2019,All Events,History Events,Lectures and Talks END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/Chicago:20191028T120000 DTEND;TZID=America/Chicago:20191028T130000 DTSTAMP:20191021T232345 CREATED:20191016T175317Z LAST-MODIFIED:20191016T175317Z UID:22012-1572264000-1572267600@history.wisc.edu SUMMARY:Lecture: Yael Zerubavel DESCRIPTION:“Desert in the Promised Land: The Politics and Semiotics of Space in Israeli Culture”\nYael Zerubavel\nProfessor Emerita of Jewish Studies and History\nRutgers University \nMonday\, October 28\, 2019\n12:00-1:00\n206 Ingraham Hall \nThe lecture draws on Zerubavel’s new book\, Desert in the Promised Land\, published by Stanford University Press (2019). At once an ecological phenomenon and a cultural construction\, the desert has varied associations in Zionist and Israeli culture. Yael Zerubavel tells the story of the desert from the early twentieth century to the present\, shedding light on romantic-mythical associations\, settlement and security concerns\, environmental sympathies\, and the commodifying tourist gaze. Drawing on literary narratives\, educational texts\, newspaper articles\, tourist materials\, films\, popular songs\, posters\, photographs\, and cartoons\, Zerubavel reveals the complexities and contradictions that mark Israeli society’s semiotics of space in relation to the Middle East\, and the central role of the “besieged island” trope in Israeli culture and politics. \nAbout the presenter: \nYael Zerubavel is Professor Emerita of Jewish Studies and History at Rutgers University\, where she served as the founding director of the Allen and Joan Bildner Center for the Study of Jewish Life (1996-1918) and the chair of the Department of Jewish Studies. Professor Zerubavel has published extensively in the areas of collective memory and identity\, national myths\, the transformation of traditions\, war and trauma\, and cultural perceptions of space\, drawing on historical sources\, Hebrew literature\, educational materials\, popular and folkloric forms\, as well as in-depth interviews. Her work addresses the impact of nationalism\, secularization\, immigration and dislocation\, the Holocaust and the Israeli-Palestinian conflict on the reshaping of Jewish memory in Israel and developments within Israeli culture. Yael Zerubavel is the author of the award-winning book\, Recovered Roots: Collective Memory and the Making of Israeli National Tradition (University of Chicago Press\, 1995) and Desert in the Promised Land (Stanford University Press\, 2019)\, and is currently working on another book manuscript entitled Biblical Reenactments: The Performance of Antiquity in Israeli Culture. \nSponsored by: Middle East Studies Program \n\n  \n URL:https://history.wisc.edu/event/lecture-yael-zerubavel/ LOCATION:Ingraham Hall\, 1155 Observatory Dr\, Madison\, WI\, 53706\, United States CATEGORIES:2019,All Events,History Events,Lectures and Talks,Middle Eastern & North African History END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/Chicago:20191031T121500 DTEND;TZID=America/Chicago:20191031T133000 DTSTAMP:20191021T232345 CREATED:20191016T153646Z LAST-MODIFIED:20191016T161109Z UID:21997-1572524100-1572528600@history.wisc.edu SUMMARY:Lecture: Joshua Cole DESCRIPTION:Click to enlarge (pdf)\n“Lethal Provocation: The Constantine Murders and the Politics of French Algeria”\nJoshua Cole\nProfessor of History\nUniversity of Michigan \nThursday\, October 31\, 2019\n12:15 PM\nMemorial Union (Check TITU listing on the day of the event) \nSponsored by: The Department of History\, The George L. Mosse Program in History\, & the Harvey Goldberg Center. \n\n  \n URL:https://history.wisc.edu/event/lecture-joshua-cole/ LOCATION:Memorial Union\, 800 Langdon St\, Madison\, WI\, 53706\, United States CATEGORIES:2019,All Events,European History,George Mosse Program,Harvey Goldberg Center,History Events,Lectures and Talks END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/Chicago:20191101T120000 DTEND;TZID=America/Chicago:20191101T130000 DTSTAMP:20191021T232345 CREATED:20190924T204000Z LAST-MODIFIED:20190924T204000Z UID:21889-1572609600-1572613200@history.wisc.edu SUMMARY:History of Science Brown Bag DESCRIPTION:“Cementing Gender: The Puccafication of Social Categories in Urbanizing India”\nSiddarth Menon\nGeography Ph.D. Student\, UW-Madison\n \nFriday\, November 1\, 2019\n12:00-1:00pm\nCurti Lounge (Rm. 5233 Humanities Bldg.) \n  \n\nAll Brown Bags are held in the Curti Lounge (unless otherwise noted) from 12:00-1:00 PM on Fridays.\nFuture Brown HSMT Bags \n\nFriday\, November 8 – “Turning your Dissertation into a Book” by Karen Darling\nFriday\, November 15 – Topic: TBA by Katharina Steiner\nFriday\, November 22 – “Experiences of irreproducibility: Students’ stories” by Nicole Nelson\nFriday\, December 6 – TBA\n\nCurti Lounge\nRm. 5233 Humanities Bldg. \n URL:https://history.wisc.edu/event/history-of-science-brown-bag-nov1/ LOCATION:WI CATEGORIES:2019,All Events,History Events,History of Science, Medicine, and Technology,Lectures and Talks,South Asian History END:VEVENT END:VCALENDAR